Category Archives: Tech tips for writers

All kinds of tricks writers can use in writing and selling their books

Using “The Bookalyser” to Help You Edit Your Manuscript

A digital eye on your text

A digital eye on your text

I’ve reblogged Louise Harnby’s “10 Ways to Proofread Your Own Writing” from Chris the Story Reading Ape’s blog. Harnby’s post is full of free tools for catching slips in your final copy. I decided to try out one of them, “The Bookalyser” on the completed ms. of my as-yet-unpublished Surfing the Bones, a 98,000-word mystery.

STB had gone through an extensive edit, not least because an online critique process had left it much richer emotionally but far too long. Even though I’m currently responding to a beta read by updating some of the technology driving the plot and making minor setting changes, I considered the draft a good example of my own editing process. So I was curious to see what an editing app could tell me. What did I miss?

I have an advantage because I’m a grammar nerd capable of catching non-standard verb forms and recognizing passive-voice constructions. I can also form plural possessives, an apparently challenging task.Green smiley with a quizzical smile So standard “grammar-checkers” don’t help me much; they usually just object to my deliberate sentence fragments or my decision to start a sentence with “But.” I wanted to see if The Bookalyser offered more.

Like many programs for writers, the BA has a free version and two levels of paid versions. I used the free one. The site says out front that the tool won’t help you with style and usage questions; Word, it says, can do that. Instead, this tool provides a numerical/statistical portrait of certain features of your ms.

As advertised, if you register with email and password, it will run through your full manuscript in seconds and provide a full printout of its findings.

Rather than describe the “more than 70 different tests (and growing) across 17 report areas,” I’ll discuss what I found most useful.

I learned that

  • I use the word “maybe” 166 times, which is 10 times more than usual for fiction. Worth a search to see if I can cut some of those. Still, 166 times in 98,000 words isn’t cause for panic, I am relieved to say.
  • Less than 1% of my text consists of the dreaded “-ly” adjectives, and only two appeared more often than expected. The app did call “belly” an “-ly” adverb, but I guess that can be forgiven in such a complex app.
  • “Filler words” like “actually,” “fairly,” “just,” and “really” made up 0.59% of my text, as compared to 0.65% for fiction in general. Still, worth doing a search to see whether these are needed.
  • I used “said” as a dialogue tag 207 times and some other tag 41 times, with only 7 of these tags used more than once. I report proudly that I used a dialogue tag with an “-ly” adverb only 8 (!!!) times in my 98,000-word text.
  • The app did look for “passive” constructions, which it defined broadly, with “is dead,” “was afraid,” and “be afraid” alongside true PV forms like “was followed” or “been killed.” In other words, predicate adjectives counted in this category. Even so, the app said that only 2.5% of my sentences fell into its “passive” categories. Hooray.
  • The app compared phrases that I had hyphenated with instances of the same phrase that I did not hyphenate. I’m pretty good on hyphens, but this choice is well worth a search.
  • It also encouraged me to look at spelling inconsistencies like “check out” vs. “checkout” and “web site” vs. “website.” Quick checks should allow me to decide on a preferred form.

Suggestions for eliminating possible redundancies were less helpful. I looked at a number of these and will look at them all, but found that the shorter version often sounded less natural, especially in dialogue. These are judgment calls often resulting in a savings of one word. While in my aggressive edit to eliminate 7000 words, every word did count, the trade-off (hmmm, hyphen?) was problematic. Example: “He didn’t admit to a crime” vs. “He didn’t admit a crime.” I’ll stick with the former. That said, the program did catch “more perfect”—but this one was in dialogue. Big green smiley

Oh, and it said it didn’t find any “Clichéd similes/comparisons.” ♥♥♥

I didn’t find useful information under “Commonly confused words and phrases,” but many writers will probably appreciate this section. The app captures proper names and variances in capitalization as well. It listed word counts of various kinds, like most frequently used, most frequently used word trios, and most frequently used to open sentences. In my first-person text, “I” opened 1329 sentences compared to “He” (645) and “The” (435). Probably not a problem, but maybe worth a look.

In short, this is a FREE, rapid-acting tool that does provide interesting insights into my writing habits, offering me the chance to save a copy editor some work one day—and to produce a better-edited text should I publish this book myself. I recommend.

 

 

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10 ways to proofread your own writing – by Louise Harnby…

I always like the advice Louise Harnby offers, and when Chris the Story Reading Ape shares one of her posts, I dive in. This post is packed with ideas for catching proofreading problems. I tried out the free “Bookalyser” app included and downloaded Harnby’s free guide to using Find/Replace in Word to catch glitches. In my next posts, I’ll report on what I found useful in the Bookalyser, and I’ll compare my own free download for using Find/Replace to catch proofreading slips to hers. In the meantime, hope you find this helpful!

Chris The Story Reading Ape's Blog

Fresh eyes on a piece of writing is ideal. Sometimes, however, the turnaround time for publication precludes it. Other times, the return on investment just won’t justify the cost of hiring a professional proofreader, especially when shorter-form content’s in play. Good enough has to be enough.

Here are 10 ideas to help you minimize errors and inconsistencies.

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How to add categories to your book on Amazon

Big word "book" in "letterpress."

Wow! I’ve been waiting for this information for ages. Join me in trying it, and let me know how it works for you!

deborahjay

Have you ever noticed that some books seem to be in lots of Amazon categories, and not just the two KDP allows you to choose when you publish your book?

Did you know you can add your book to more categories simply by contacting KDP support? You can have it in up to 10 categories, making it much more likely people will come across it when they search their Amazon site.

But why would I want my book in more categories?

Put simply, the more categories your book shows up in, the more people will see your book on Amazon.

Your book will show up in every step of the category pathway, for example, if one category path for your book is:

Kindle Store > Kindle eBooks>Science Fiction and Fantasy>Fantasy>Action & Adventure

your book will show up in each of the categories mentioned. Ideally, you want your book to…

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FREE Download: What You WILL Miss When You Edit!

Tricks for finding those pesky little slips your eyes skip when you read.An image for What You WILL Miss When You Proofread; clickable link to the download

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FREE Download! What You WILL Miss When You Proofread!

It’s a plain truth that our eyes skip over typos when we’re proofreading our own work. Words you left out or accidentally cut (or accidentally failed to cut) may be the hardest mistakes to catch. But the good news is that you CAN catch another type of invisible errors: punctuation and spacing glitches that detract from the professional manuscript you want to market under your name.

In this pdf, What You WILL Miss When You Proofread, I’ve combined three blog posts to show you some simple tricks using an old friend, Find/Replace, to search for and fix common typos from double periods to missing quotes. You won’t need any elaborate codes; all the commands you need are right there in the FIND box.

My fixes are based on Word, but you should be able to adapt them to any word-processing program you use.

Download!

An image for What You WILL Miss When You Proofread

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Writing Software: Why you need Microsoft Word – by Lisa Poisso…

And now a completely different opinion on whether you can or should replace Word. I’m not the best judge here because my old Word still works fine for me. The phrase “industry standard” does carry some weight; again, it may come down to the question of how many obstacles you want to put between yourself and your prospective agent or editor. What do you think?

Chris The Story Reading Ape's Blog

When your book is ready for editing, it’s time to pack it neatly into an industry-standard file format. Whether you write in dedicated writing software like Scrivener or key your story into Google Docs after writing it longhand, a finished novel isn’t a private creative endeavor or hobby anymore. Now it’s a product for an industry with professional standards and technical requirements.

If your manuscript is destined for a literary agent, freelance editor, formatter, designer, publisher, or other professional, the standard format is Microsoft Word.

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10 Totally Free Microsoft Word Alternatives For Writers – by Derek Haines…

For years, I’ve used a 2008 version of Word that came with the computer before this one. I’ve successfully uploaded to Smashwords, Ingram, and Amazon using that ancient system. At the same time, my curiosity is whetted. Have you tried any of these programs? Do they work better than Word, and if so, how?

Chris The Story Reading Ape's Blog

on Just Publishing Advice:

Do you really need all those Microsoft Office programs just to write?

Writers write words. Are you a writer?

I’m sure you don’t prepare business plans with charts and graphs. You don’t use online collaboration tools. You don’t schedule meetings for a group of directors.

I doubt if you would ever need to create business presentations with 100 slides.

You write your words down for blog posts, content articles, guest posts, short stories and maybe poems. So why do you pay for MS Office to do these simple writing tasks?

There is no need to pay for a word processor

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THE THINGS YOU MISS WHEN YOU PROOFREAD, PART 3: Creative Finds and Fixes

Part 3: Proofreading Slips You Can Find and Fix with Creative Tricks

Fact: You will miss things when you proofread your manuscript. Your eyes see what they expect to see.

Fact: A little creative use of Find/Replace, in Word or your preferred program, can find these hard-to-spot slips for you—and fix them with a keystroke.

I’ve split this post into three subposts, so you can use what you need when and if you need it:

These posts are based on Word, but most of the notations are universal. You should be able to apply them in any program you use.

These hard-to-see slips take a little more creativity to find and address than those in Part 2, but most of these searches will return “Not Found,” so you just move on to the next.

In each case below, I will

  • List the problem,
  • Show you what to type in the Find bar in the Find dialogue box
  • Show you when to eyeball if context is important
  • Show you what to type in the Replace bar
  • Tell you when to click “Replace all” or when to click Replace

In some cases below, I tell you that you can click “Replace all” after eyeballing to check that you’re finding the right combination. However, I generally eyeball each instance (there won’t be that many) and click “Replace.”

Do NOT type “+” in the Find or Replace bars unless you are actually searching for the “plus” sign. I am using it below to indicate “then type.” There should be no spaces between symbols in the bars unless you are specifically searching for a space.

For example, the first direction below would look like ^p’ in your Find bar.

Problem: Single quote marks

These are almost invisible! Apply several formulas to find them, since they can occur in different situations.

Formula 1: Single quotes at the beginning of a paragraph of dialogue

  • Find: ^p and a single quote mark (‘). (The ^ lives above the numeral 6.)
  • Eyeball one or two to make sure you’re finding the right combination.
  • Replace: ^p + a double quote mark (“). (This will look like ^p”)
  • Click: Replace all

Formula 2: Single quotes at the beginning of a line of dialogue that’s not at the beginning of a paragraph

  • Find: one space (tap space bar) + a single quote mark (‘). (When you tap the space bar, you won’t see anything in the Find bar, but the cursor will move.)
  • Eyeball to check that you have not found dialogue within dialogue, which takes a single quote mark.
  • Replace: space + double quote (“)
  • Click: Replace.

Formula 3: Single quote marks at the end of line of dialogue within a longer paragraph

  • Find: a single quote mark (‘), then space (tap the space key).
  • Eyeball to check that you have not found dialogue within dialogue, which takes a single quote mark.
  • Replace: double quote marks (“), then space
  • Click: Replace.

Formula 4: Single quotes at the end of a line of dialogue that ends the paragraph.

  • Find: a single quote + ^p. (You might also run a check with single quote, then space, then ^p , since you may have typed a space after the quote mark.)
  • Eyeball to check.
  • Replace: double quote + ^p
  • Click: Replace all.

Problem: An extra space before or after a quote mark.

These can cause your smart quote marks to “turn around,” since Word decides which direction they should face depending on whether they come before or after a line of type.

  • Find: space + quote marks + space. (Finds extra spaces at both the beginning or end of a line of dialogue).
  • Eyeball each instance.
  • Replace: Same as above with incorrect space eliminated.
  • Click: Replace.

OR

  • Find: ^p + quote marks + space bar.(Finds this problem at the beginning of a paragraph).
  • Eyeball each instance.
  • Replace: ^p + quote marks
  • Click: Replace.

Problem: An extra space at the beginning of a paragraph.

These create a ragged indent line that you may not spot by eyeballing.

  • Find: ^p + space
  • Replace: ^p
  • Click: Replace all

*******

Completely missing quotes like those illustrated in the next section are the most challenging to find. This section suggests a couple of Find tricks you can try—and maybe you can invent your own.

Problem: Missing quotes at the end of a line of dialogue. Example: “It’s cold in here, said Tom.

  • Find: comma + space + s. (Make sure you’ve already eliminated double spaces!)
  • Eyeball each instance.
  • Replace: comma + quote marks + space + s
  • Click: Replace.

Repeat with question marks as well as exclamation marks if you use them.

Repeat with the first letter of characters’ names, so you will also catch “It’s cold in here, Tom said.

Repeat with “asked,” “replied,” “demanded,” or whatever dialogue tags you often use.

Problem: Missing quotes at the beginning of a line of dialogue

I haven’t devised a foolproof way of finding these. Here’s one trick that will find some. Examples: X said, It’s warm in here.” OR “Boy,” X said, it’s warm in here.”

  • Find: said + comma+ space  + ^$ (for “any letter”) (Check “More,” then “Special” to make sure this is the correct notation for “any letter” in your version of Word.)
  • Replace: said + comma+ space  + quote marks + ^$
  • Click: Replace
  • Repeat with other dialogue tags you commonly use.

If you can think of a way to find missing quote marks at the beginning of a paragraph or before and after random narrative/actions rather than dialogue tags, please share!

Problem: Capitalized dialogue tags

These errors result when you have Autocorrect turned on, using its default settings. It may be set to capitalize letters after periods, question marks, and exclamation points. Example: “Is it warm in here to you?” Asked Tom.

  • Find: relevant punctuation mark + quote marks + A (or S for “said” or R for “replied” or whatever), and then check “Match case.”
  • Replace: relevant punctuation mark + quote marks + a (or s for “said” or r for “replied” or whatever)
  • Click: Replace

(You can prevent this by adjusting your settings in Autocorrect.)

Back to Part 2: Minute Finds and Fixes

Back to Part 1: Secrets of Find/Replace

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THE THINGS YOU MISS WHEN YOU PROOFREAD, PART 2: Minute Finds and Fixes

Part 2: Proofreading Slips You Can Find and Fix in Minutes

Fact: You will miss things when you proofread your manuscript. Your eyes see what they expect to see.

Fact: A little creative use of Find/Replace, in Word or your preferred program, can find these hard-to-spot slips for you—and fix them with a keystroke.

I’ve split this post into three subposts, so you can use what you need when and if you need it:

These posts are based on Word, but most of the notations are universal. You should be able to apply them in any program you use.

Minute Fixes Using Find/Replace

Again, these are problems that are easy to miss if you’re eyeballing. Find has much better eyesight than you do!

In each case below, I will

  • List the problem,
  • Show you what to type in the Find bar in the Find dialogue box
  • Show you when to eyeball if context is important
  • Show you what to type in the Replace bar
  • Tell you when to click “Replace all” or when to eyeball before clicking Replace

Do NOT type “+” in the Find or Replace bars unless you are actually searching for the “plus” sign. I am using it below to indicate “then type.” There should be no spaces between symbols in the bars unless you are specifically searching for a space.

Problem: Double periods

  • Find: period + period (..)
  • Replace: a single period (.)
  • Click: Replace all

Problem: Comma + period or period + comma

  • Find: Either ., or ,. (Do one at a time)
  • Eyeball: The punctuation you need depends on the context
  • Replace: Minimize key strokes by doing all the ones that can be replaced with a period, then coming back and doing all the ones that can be replaced with a comma. Type either a period (.) or a comma (,).
  • Click: Replace

Problem: Extra spaces

Used to typing a double space after periods, and HATE being told that’s no longer preferred? You don’t need to remember to single-space. Do what you like. Then:

  • Find: Tap the space bar on your keyboard twice. (You will see nothing in the bar but the cursor will move.)
  • Replace: Tap the space bar once.
  • Click: Replace All.

Do this twice just in case you accidentally typed in three spaces here and there.

Problem: Tabs

If you’ve posted to Kindle or Smashwords, you know that tabs are NOT allowed. You’re encouraged to do all your formatting, including first-line indents, with Styles. But even if you apply a perfect Style throughout your manuscript, any tabs you haven’t removed will still be there, creating all sorts of formatting glitches.

  • Find: ^t (the ^ mark lives above the numeral 6)
  • Replace: leave blank
  • Click: Replace All.

Problem: Extra Returns

Make sure you didn’t accidentally insert a space between paragraphs.

  • Find: ^p^p
  • Replace: ^p
  • Eyeball, since some of your double returns will be deliberate, for example, to mark a scene break.
  • Click: Replace when appropriate.

Problem: Manual Line Breaks

These are those funny little arrows that sometimes show up when you’ve copied and pasted from an odd source, like an email. They won’t format properly when you upload.

Do you want the lines to combine into a single paragraph, or do you want a paragraph break?

Paragraph break: Do this first, then do each affected paragraph as a separate chunk (see “Single paragraph” below)

  • Find: ^l (lower-case L)
  • Eyeball: Locate places where you want a paragraph break; select only those.
  • Replace: ^p.

Single paragraph:

  • Find: ^l
  • Select the lines you want to combine.
  • Replace: space (tap space bar once)
  • Eyeball: Have you created double spaces? If so, replace double spaces with singles (see above).

Problem: Double hyphens to em dashes

Double hyphens (–) are a clumsy substitute for the more elegant and correct em dash (a long dash). On a Mac, you can create an em dash in your text by typing Shift + Option + hyphen, but on a PC, you have to “insert” the special character. So being able to type double hyphens and replace them with em dashes in one fell swoop can save a lot of time (you could actually program Autocorrect to do this if you want).

  • Find:  — (2 hyphens)
  • Replace: Open “More,” then “Special” in the Find box and click on “Em Dash.” The appropriate notation will appear in the bar. (The notation for an em dash appears to be different depending on your version of Word.)*
  • Click: Replace all.

 

*If any of the notations I’ve given you don’t work properly, use the Special list to figure out the correct one for your program or computer.

Next: Part 3: Creative Finds and Fixes

Back to Part 1: Secrets of Find/Replace

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Do you know how to publish an ebook with pictures?

Source: Do you know how to publish an ebook with pictures?

Workspace in InDesignHere’s a post from last fall that I swiped from Jean’s Writing! Now that I’m about to epublish my “Beginner’s Cheat Sheet” on formatting your own Print-on-Demand book using InDesign, I’m going to need all the help I can get on formatting ebooks with graphics! What I like in Jean’s video is the idea that you can force text and image to stay together. Does anyone have any experience adding graphics to Kindle ebooks? Does this look like a good process to you? Any help will be WELCOME!

 

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