Category Archives: Marketing books

Useful Info on Amazon Review Rules

Books flying into reviewers' hands.As usual, The Book Designer provides important information for those of us learning to market our books. Here, Amy Collins, book distributor and marketer, clears up those pesky Amazon rules on book reviews. I haven’t seen this information laid out more clearly than this.

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Filed under Amazon Kindle Direct Publishing, business of writing, Free Books, indie publishing, Marketing, Marketing books, Money!, Print on Demand, Reviews, Self-publishing, Writing

CreateSpace Merges With KDP

More news on the CreateSpace front!

Nicholas C. Rossis

CreateSpace-Amazon logos | From the blog of Nicholas C. Rossis, author of science fiction, the Pearseus epic fantasy series and children's booksThe day we’ve all been waiting for (or, in some cases, dreading) is here! CreateSpace has officially announced that CreateSpace (CSP) and Kindle Direct Publishing (KDP) will become one service. All titles it hosts will now move to Kindle Direct Publishing (KDP). As I had guessed, CS will, in effect, become one of Amazon’s production and distribution centers, printing the titles on behalf of KDP.

If you wish to compare the pros and cons of KDP compared to CreateSpace, check out my earlier posts, KDP Print Just Got A Whole Lot More Attractive and Moving Your Book From Createspace to KDP Print.

CreateSpace Says…

Here is the official announcement in CreateSpace’s own words (text in bold emphasized by me):

“In the coming days, we will give CreateSpace members the ability to move their account and titles. To ensure a quality experience, we will add links to the CreateSpace…

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Filed under Amazon Kindle Direct Publishing, business of writing, indie publishing, Marketing books, novels, Print on Demand, Publishing, Self-publishing, Writing

You Get Free Book Promotion Every Time You Leave A Comment – by Derek Haines…

Chris the Story Reading Ape regularly shares Derek Haines’s posts. Pay attention! They are always worth a read. Here’s another one I’m going to put to use, starting today!

Chris The Story Reading Ape's Blog

on Just Publishing Advice:

Blog commenting is the easiest way to promote your book for free

There are hundreds of ways to promote a book.

You can use free and paid book promotion sites, write a blog post every week and offer free books.

Marketing your book to find potential readers is a non-stop effort if you want to sell your book,

If you have published more than one title, you will know how much hard work is involved in keeping the buzz going for your books and ebooks.

Encouraging people to take an interest is not easy and is sometimes counterproductive.

Direct approaches using social media or even your email list often only achieve very low click-through rates, and poor conversions to book sales.

But when people accidentally stumble upon you without you coercing them, the results can be surprising. In SEO speak, it is called organic traffic.

The…

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Filed under blogging, business of writing, indie publishing, Marketing books, Money!, Self-publishing, social media, Writing

Common Book Marketing Traps to Avoid…

Some useful advice from marketing expert Penny Sansevieri via Chris the Story Reading Ape. A reminder to me to a) get more proactive about marketing, and b) to get that next book out. I’ll go work on that now!

Chris The Story Reading Ape's Blog

By Penny C. Sansevieri  on Book Works:

There’s a ton of information out there for indie authors. However, there is also a lot of misinformation, too, as well as outright lies about book marketing. And indie authors are left in the cold to sort through the truths, semi-truths, and non-truths for themselves. Which means that you may end up figuring out the best path through trial and error, falling into common book marketing traps in the process.

Because I believe that empowering authors to follow the best practices elevates the whole industry, today, I’m taking some time to set the record straight.  Indie authors, read on to learn some of the biggest book marketing traps and pitfalls and how to navigate around them for the best success.

Continue reading HERE

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Filed under business of writing, indie publishing, Marketing books, Money!, Myths and Truths, novels, Print on Demand, Self-publishing, Writing

Small Publishers – A Checklist #wwwblogs #amwriting

What would you add to this thoughtful post from Alison Williams Writing? Have your experiences with small publishers been good or bad? Are indie writers better off self-publishing? What do you think?

Alison Williams Writing

checklist

I recently wrote a bit of a rant about the quality control of some small presses whose books I had read. You can read it here.

If you are thinking of signing with a small publisher, then do bear a few things in mind.

  • Do your homework – start off by Googling the publisher. You might find threads on writing sites that go into a great deal of detail about your chosen publisher. Read them – they can be incredibly enlightening.
  • Ask questions – if your publisher is honest and genuinely wants the best for you, they should accept that you have a right to want to know about them. After all, you are placing your book and all the blood, sweat and tears that went into writing it in their hands.

Ask:

  • Who are they?
  • How long have they been publishing?
  • What exactly is their background and experience?…

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Filed under business of writing, ebooks, Editing, indie publishing, looking for editors, Marketing books, Money!, Myths and Truths, novels, Publishing, publishing contracts, Scams, Self-publishing, small presses, Working with editors, Writing

12 book marketing buzzwords you need to know via Sandra Beckwith

I found this really helpful! Thanks for Don Massenzio for passing it along.

Source: 12 book marketing buzzwords you need to know via Sandra Beckwith #h2e

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Amazon’s “Gray” Book Market Explained

Is Amazon's third-party-seller system robbing authors?

Is Amazon’s third-party-seller system robbing authors?

Today’s New York Times reports on the change in Amazon’s book-selling practices that allows third-party sellers to sell as “new” books they’ve acquired from remainder stocks or book reviewers as well as other sources. Authors won’t receive royalties on these sales, just as they would not from sales in used-book stores.

I’m posting this because I saw this issue flair up only briefly in a couple of the blogs I follow, and I thought it might be of interest to more writers.

The comments (at this writing there weren’t very many) challenge some of the assumptions and premises in the article. A recurring theme seemed to be that the publishing industry could do a better job of rewarding authors out front so that they were paid for their work regardless. Another is that as publishers buy into the print-on-demand trend, this form of supposed piracy will diminish.

There’s no discussion in the article of indie publishing. The focus is on hard-cover “new” books that would ordinarily provide royalties to the writers.

What about it? Is this a non-issue for you? Is it an issue only for writers aspiring to be traditionally published? I found myself wanting to comment that this article and Amazon’s policy is an argument for becoming one’s own publisher, in wh

ich case no book leaves “the store” unless the author has been paid for it. What do you think?

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Filed under Amazon pricing policy, business of writing, indie publishing, Marketing books, Money!, novels, Print on Demand, Publishing, publishing contracts, Self-publishing, Writing