Tag Archives: Alliance of Independent Authors

BELIEVE! Do Not Pay Someone to Publish Your Book! ALLI Agrees.

Your book ready to publish--dreamscape!

Dreams of publication? Yes!

Here’s support from ALLI, the Alliance of Independent Authors, for my claim that you SHOULD NEVER PAY SOMEONE TO PUBLISH YOUR BOOK. Yes, there are some reputable book packagers out there who will charge you for various services, but the chances that you will make back what they charge you are slim. YOU CAN DO THIS YOURSELF. This ALLI article explains why it is so easy to fall for vanity scams. Here’s an important quote:

Many vanity presses will try to persuade authors that they are incapable of producing a professional book without an expensive full-service publishing package. This is particularly effective on authors who may not be comfortable with new technology; the idea of handing off the details of publishing to someone who will take care of it for you is alluring.

Do not be fooled. You can start your book off with a very modest investment if you apply very basic skills to get it formatted and posted. Spend your money on a cover and an ISBN, not on thousands of dollars for “publication” you’ll never get back.

Maybe you’ll notice that I’m very passionate about this. I just hate scams.I swear I'll catch up my SEO!

 

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Filed under Amazon Kindle Direct Publishing, business of writing, indie publishing, Myths and Truths, novels, Print on Demand, Publishing, publishing contracts, Scams, Self-publishing, Writing

Earn a Salary by Writing Novels? Not So Fast.

Books as stairs to publishing successVictoria Strauss of Writer Beware assesses a start-up, “De Montfort Literature,” that promises to hire writers for $24,000 a year plus royalties just to write novels. Strauss and John Doppler from the Alliance of Independent Authors find that there’s a lot less to DML than meets the eye. If you’ve encountered this kind of proposition and it intrigues you, READ THIS CAREFULLY.

For my own part, I take exception to De Montfort’s claim in an interview with The Guardian that in contrast to his arrangement, “self-publishing is costly and time-consuming.” Not so. Anybody with the time and self-discipline to write a novel will find plenty of excellent how-tos that make it possible to publish online in a matter of an hour or so. My book, You CAN Format Your Print-on-Demand Book! is just one of many that make publishing your own paperback the work of just a few days.

Authors have never had so many options and so much freedom. Don’t sell yourself short!

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Filed under business of writing, Copyright, indie publishing, Money!, novels, Print on Demand, Publishing, publishing contracts, Scams, Self-publishing, Writing

Best and Worst Self-Publishing Services Reviewed & Rated by the Alliance of Independent Authors (ALLi)…

Comprehensive list from the Alliance of Independent Authors! Thanks to Chris the Story Reading Ape for providing this link!

Chris The Story Reading Ape's Blog

The Watchdog Desk of The Alliance of Independent Authors monitors the self-publishing industry in two ways.

1. We have a Partner Membership for services which align with our Code of Standards and go through a vetting process.

2. We identify rogue services which overcharge, over-promise, under-deliver, or in any way exploit authors.

The ratings below are the opinion of the Watchdog Desk. Ratings are based on careful appraisals of multiple criteria, including pricing and value, quality of service, contract terms and rights, transparency, accountability, and customer satisfaction.

See the full list and details HERE

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Filed under business of writing, indie publishing, novels, Print on Demand, Publishing, Scams, Self-publishing, Writing

Five Questions Indie Authors Should Ask Agents

A couple of posts ago I linked to an article that took me to this post from Dean Wesley Smith, in which he informed us that the current industry standard in traditional publishing is “life-of-copyright,” which basically means that we will never regain the rights to our work, regardless of the publisher’s intentions for our books, and that the most we can expect in the way of advances is $5000 or so.

I’ve posted questions about these claims to a couple of active blogs on the business of writing, including to an agent’s blog, and will be posting to others. In my searches, I came across this post about how indie authors should expect agents to protect their rights, which is directly relevant to these issues.

This appeared on the web site of the Alliance of Independent Authors. I’m following their blog and will share interesting information.

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Filed under business of writing, ebooks, Money!, Myths and Truths, novels, Self-publishing