Tag Archives: intellectual property

More on Internet Archive’s “Emergency Library”: Are They Giving Away Your Books for Free?

This long piece from Publishing Perspectives provides detailed information about the debate over whether Internet Archive is within the law to copy or upload copyrighted material and give it away for free. Apparently the site’s latest ploy, an “Emergency Library” triggered by the COVID-19 situation, has attracted the attention of a Congressional committee, so changes may be coming.

A library shelf with many colorful books.

Within the Publishing Perspectives article is a link to an Authors Guild piece that contains directions for finding out if your books show up for free on Internet Archive as well as a form takedown notice you can use.

I’ve written before about my travails trying to find and challenge every rogue site that claimed to be selling my books; I came to agree with Neil Gaiman that just maybe, free books equal free publicity. I’d successfully claimed my rights to King of the Roses from IA, but had not searched their site for Blood Lies. This time around, though, I did feel motivated by this rather audacious behavior on IA’s part to search for both books. Couldn’t find either. So for now, I’m safe on that front.

However, each author must make their own decision about whether to leave their books in IA’s hands for the duration. The Publishing Perspectives piece gives you the information you need for your own choice.

Stack of many books

Check this post, too, to learn about the Marrakesh Treaty, which governs the provision of materials to people who are print-disabled. I was glad to learn about this. You might find it interesting.

Update me on what you decide, and how your actions work out.

 

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Filed under business of writing, Copyright for writers, Free Books, Money issues for writers, writing novels

Ever Heard of “Awards Profiteers”? Victoria Strauss Exposes

Your book ready to publish--dreamscape!

Writer Beware shines light where it’s most needed!

If you don’t follow @victoriastrauss and Writer Beware, you should. Here’s another example: For all of us who sometimes send our work off to writing contests or writing awards competitions, how to tell if we’re falling for a scam. Strauss identifies the components of “awards profiteering” in which the main purpose of the “award” is to make money for the people offering it. Here’s an example of scary language in the writing contest submission guidelines of one contest—what you must agree to if you enter—analyzed in depth, with responses from the contest sponsor.

Writer Beware, indeed.

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Filed under business of writing, Copyright for writers, publishing contracts, writing contests, writing scams