Amazon’s “Gray” Book Market Explained

Is Amazon's third-party-seller system robbing authors?

Is Amazon’s third-party-seller system robbing authors?

Today’s New York Times reports on the change in Amazon’s book-selling practices that allows third-party sellers to sell as “new” books they’ve acquired from remainder stocks or book reviewers as well as other sources. Authors won’t receive royalties on these sales, just as they would not from sales in used-book stores.

I’m posting this because I saw this issue flair up only briefly in a couple of the blogs I follow, and I thought it might be of interest to more writers.

The comments (at this writing there weren’t very many) challenge some of the assumptions and premises in the article. A recurring theme seemed to be that the publishing industry could do a better job of rewarding authors out front so that they were paid for their work regardless. Another is that as publishers buy into the print-on-demand trend, this form of supposed piracy will diminish.

There’s no discussion in the article of indie publishing. The focus is on hard-cover “new” books that would ordinarily provide royalties to the writers.

What about it? Is this a non-issue for you? Is it an issue only for writers aspiring to be traditionally published? I found myself wanting to comment that this article and Amazon’s policy is an argument for becoming one’s own publisher, in wh

ich case no book leaves “the store” unless the author has been paid for it. What do you think?

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Filed under Amazon pricing policy, business of writing, indie publishing, Marketing books, Money!, novels, Print on Demand, Publishing, publishing contracts, Self-publishing, Writing

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