Category Archives: Tech tips

THE THINGS YOU MISS WHEN YOU PROOFREAD, PART 3: Creative Finds and Fixes

Part 3: Proofreading Slips You Can Find and Fix with Creative Tricks

Fact: You will miss things when you proofread your manuscript. Your eyes see what they expect to see.

Fact: A little creative use of Find/Replace, in Word or your preferred program, can find these hard-to-spot slips for you—and fix them with a keystroke.

I’ve split this post into three subposts, so you can use what you need when and if you need it:

These posts are based on Word, but most of the notations are universal. You should be able to apply them in any program you use.

These hard-to-see slips take a little more creativity to find and address than those in Part 2, but most of these searches will return “Not Found,” so you just move on to the next.

In each case below, I will

  • List the problem,
  • Show you what to type in the Find bar in the Find dialogue box
  • Show you when to eyeball if context is important
  • Show you what to type in the Replace bar
  • Tell you when to click “Replace all” or when to click Replace

In some cases below, I tell you that you can click “Replace all” after eyeballing to check that you’re finding the right combination. However, I generally eyeball each instance (there won’t be that many) and click “Replace.”

Do NOT type “+” in the Find or Replace bars unless you are actually searching for the “plus” sign. I am using it below to indicate “then type.” There should be no spaces between symbols in the bars unless you are specifically searching for a space.

For example, the first direction below would look like ^p’ in your Find bar.

Problem: Single quote marks

These are almost invisible! Apply several formulas to find them, since they can occur in different situations.

Formula 1: Single quotes at the beginning of a paragraph of dialogue

  • Find: ^p and a single quote mark (‘). (The ^ lives above the numeral 6.)
  • Eyeball one or two to make sure you’re finding the right combination.
  • Replace: ^p + a double quote mark (“). (This will look like ^p”)
  • Click: Replace all

Formula 2: Single quotes at the beginning of a line of dialogue that’s not at the beginning of a paragraph

  • Find: one space (tap space bar) + a single quote mark (‘). (When you tap the space bar, you won’t see anything in the Find bar, but the cursor will move.)
  • Eyeball to check that you have not found dialogue within dialogue, which takes a single quote mark.
  • Replace: space + double quote (“)
  • Click: Replace.

Formula 3: Single quote marks at the end of line of dialogue within a longer paragraph

  • Find: a single quote mark (‘), then space (tap the space key).
  • Eyeball to check that you have not found dialogue within dialogue, which takes a single quote mark.
  • Replace: double quote marks (“), then space
  • Click: Replace.

Formula 4: Single quotes at the end of a line of dialogue that ends the paragraph.

  • Find: a single quote + ^p. (You might also run a check with single quote, then space, then ^p , since you may have typed a space after the quote mark.)
  • Eyeball to check.
  • Replace: double quote + ^p
  • Click: Replace all.

Problem: An extra space before or after a quote mark.

These can cause your smart quote marks to “turn around,” since Word decides which direction they should face depending on whether they come before or after a line of type.

  • Find: space + quote marks + space. (Finds extra spaces at both the beginning or end of a line of dialogue).
  • Eyeball each instance.
  • Replace: Same as above with incorrect space eliminated.
  • Click: Replace.

OR

  • Find: ^p + quote marks + space bar.(Finds this problem at the beginning of a paragraph).
  • Eyeball each instance.
  • Replace: ^p + quote marks
  • Click: Replace.

Problem: An extra space at the beginning of a paragraph.

These create a ragged indent line that you may not spot by eyeballing.

  • Find: ^p + space
  • Replace: ^p
  • Click: Replace all

*******

Completely missing quotes like those illustrated in the next section are the most challenging to find. This section suggests a couple of Find tricks you can try—and maybe you can invent your own.

Problem: Missing quotes at the end of a line of dialogue. Example: “It’s cold in here, said Tom.

  • Find: comma + space + s. (Make sure you’ve already eliminated double spaces!)
  • Eyeball each instance.
  • Replace: comma + quote marks + space + s
  • Click: Replace.

Repeat with question marks as well as exclamation marks if you use them.

Repeat with the first letter of characters’ names, so you will also catch “It’s cold in here, Tom said.

Repeat with “asked,” “replied,” “demanded,” or whatever dialogue tags you often use.

Problem: Missing quotes at the beginning of a line of dialogue

I haven’t devised a foolproof way of finding these. Here’s one trick that will find some. Examples: X said, It’s warm in here.” OR “Boy,” X said, it’s warm in here.”

  • Find: said + comma+ space  + ^$ (for “any letter”) (Check “More,” then “Special” to make sure this is the correct notation for “any letter” in your version of Word.)
  • Replace: said + comma+ space  + quote marks + ^$
  • Click: Replace
  • Repeat with other dialogue tags you commonly use.

If you can think of a way to find missing quote marks at the beginning of a paragraph or before and after random narrative/actions rather than dialogue tags, please share!

Problem: Capitalized dialogue tags

These errors result when you have Autocorrect turned on, using its default settings. It may be set to capitalize letters after periods, question marks, and exclamation points. Example: “Is it warm in here to you?” Asked Tom.

  • Find: relevant punctuation mark + quote marks + A (or S for “said” or R for “replied” or whatever), and then check “Match case.”
  • Replace: relevant punctuation mark + quote marks + a (or s for “said” or r for “replied” or whatever)
  • Click: Replace

(You can prevent this by adjusting your settings in Autocorrect.)

Back to Part 2: Minute Finds and Fixes

Back to Part 1: Secrets of Find/Replace

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THE THINGS YOU MISS WHEN YOU PROOFREAD, PART 2: Minute Finds and Fixes

Part 2: Proofreading Slips You Can Find and Fix in Minutes

Fact: You will miss things when you proofread your manuscript. Your eyes see what they expect to see.

Fact: A little creative use of Find/Replace, in Word or your preferred program, can find these hard-to-spot slips for you—and fix them with a keystroke.

I’ve split this post into three subposts, so you can use what you need when and if you need it:

These posts are based on Word, but most of the notations are universal. You should be able to apply them in any program you use.

Minute Fixes Using Find/Replace

Again, these are problems that are easy to miss if you’re eyeballing. Find has much better eyesight than you do!

In each case below, I will

  • List the problem,
  • Show you what to type in the Find bar in the Find dialogue box
  • Show you when to eyeball if context is important
  • Show you what to type in the Replace bar
  • Tell you when to click “Replace all” or when to eyeball before clicking Replace

Do NOT type “+” in the Find or Replace bars unless you are actually searching for the “plus” sign. I am using it below to indicate “then type.” There should be no spaces between symbols in the bars unless you are specifically searching for a space.

Problem: Double periods

  • Find: period + period (..)
  • Replace: a single period (.)
  • Click: Replace all

Problem: Comma + period or period + comma

  • Find: Either ., or ,. (Do one at a time)
  • Eyeball: The punctuation you need depends on the context
  • Replace: Minimize key strokes by doing all the ones that can be replaced with a period, then coming back and doing all the ones that can be replaced with a comma. Type either a period (.) or a comma (,).
  • Click: Replace

Problem: Extra spaces

Used to typing a double space after periods, and HATE being told that’s no longer preferred? You don’t need to remember to single-space. Do what you like. Then:

  • Find: Tap the space bar on your keyboard twice. (You will see nothing in the bar but the cursor will move.)
  • Replace: Tap the space bar once.
  • Click: Replace All.

Do this twice just in case you accidentally typed in three spaces here and there.

Problem: Tabs

If you’ve posted to Kindle or Smashwords, you know that tabs are NOT allowed. You’re encouraged to do all your formatting, including first-line indents, with Styles. But even if you apply a perfect Style throughout your manuscript, any tabs you haven’t removed will still be there, creating all sorts of formatting glitches.

  • Find: ^t (the ^ mark lives above the numeral 6)
  • Replace: leave blank
  • Click: Replace All.

Problem: Extra Returns

Make sure you didn’t accidentally insert a space between paragraphs.

  • Find: ^p^p
  • Replace: ^p
  • Eyeball, since some of your double returns will be deliberate, for example, to mark a scene break.
  • Click: Replace when appropriate.

Problem: Manual Line Breaks

These are those funny little arrows that sometimes show up when you’ve copied and pasted from an odd source, like an email. They won’t format properly when you upload.

Do you want the lines to combine into a single paragraph, or do you want a paragraph break?

Paragraph break: Do this first, then do each affected paragraph as a separate chunk (see “Single paragraph” below)

  • Find: ^l (lower-case L)
  • Eyeball: Locate places where you want a paragraph break; select only those.
  • Replace: ^p.

Single paragraph:

  • Find: ^l
  • Select the lines you want to combine.
  • Replace: space (tap space bar once)
  • Eyeball: Have you created double spaces? If so, replace double spaces with singles (see above).

Problem: Double hyphens to em dashes

Double hyphens (–) are a clumsy substitute for the more elegant and correct em dash (a long dash). On a Mac, you can create an em dash in your text by typing Shift + Option + hyphen, but on a PC, you have to “insert” the special character. So being able to type double hyphens and replace them with em dashes in one fell swoop can save a lot of time (you could actually program Autocorrect to do this if you want).

  • Find:  — (2 hyphens)
  • Replace: Open “More,” then “Special” in the Find box and click on “Em Dash.” The appropriate notation will appear in the bar. (The notation for an em dash appears to be different depending on your version of Word.)*
  • Click: Replace all.

 

*If any of the notations I’ve given you don’t work properly, use the Special list to figure out the correct one for your program or computer.

Next: Part 3: Creative Finds and Fixes

Back to Part 1: Secrets of Find/Replace

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Do you know how to publish an ebook with pictures?

Source: Do you know how to publish an ebook with pictures?

Workspace in InDesignHere’s a post from last fall that I swiped from Jean’s Writing! Now that I’m about to epublish my “Beginner’s Cheat Sheet” on formatting your own Print-on-Demand book using InDesign, I’m going to need all the help I can get on formatting ebooks with graphics! What I like in Jean’s video is the idea that you can force text and image to stay together. Does anyone have any experience adding graphics to Kindle ebooks? Does this look like a good process to you? Any help will be WELCOME!

 

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How to Tweet Like a Pro [Lab]

I’m working on developing these practices. Let me know if you have other tips!

Author Steve Boseley - Half a Loaf of Fiction

Tweet like a proTwitter is one tool in an author’s bag that can, if used effectively, be utilised to assist in the building of your author platform, which you hope ultimately will result in book sales, plus it’s a great way to make a connection with influencers or to speak to your readers. But a question that was raised in my mind, was:

How do I compose an effective Tweet?

I recently wrote a guest post for Nicholas Rossis’ blog titled What is the best time to Tweet. Choosing the right time to Tweet is definitely an element of what goes into an effective Tweet. Check out that post (when you’ve finished this one!) for guidance.

But for a Tweet to be effective, it involves a lot more than just publishing at the right time, so read on for the anatomy of an effective Tweet.

Content

According to Twitter, there are…

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Creating a Universal Amazon Link – One Link Amazon Sites in all Countries

This is really important if you’re trying to run ad campaigns. It worked perfectly for me. Thanks to Don Massenzio for reposting his original advice.

Author Don Massenzio

I posted this tip a while ago and got some positive feedback. If you set up buying links for your books, many of you are probably posting Amazon links for each country that you think your book will likely realize some sales.

There is no need to do this.

I was getting frustrated when I ran a free book promotion weekend and experimented with placing a Facebook ad that reached out to multiple countries. My dilemma with doing this is that I didn’t have a way to post all of the links for the various Amazon sites in other countries on my ad without it looking clumsy.

I searched for a way to create a universal link for my book. A universal link, when clicked by a potential reader, is designed to take them to my book on the appropriate Amazon page for their country.

All they needed to do was…

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Do you want to know just the right word?

Thanks, Jean! I’ve been using Thesaurus.com with excellent results—way better than that thin list on Word. But this tool looks even more useful. I’ll give it a try today and pass on my results.

Jean's Writing

Happens to me more than I’d like to admit!

I’ve found a tool to help!

I’m on a roll, typing like a maniac. 

Until I stumble over a word.

My writing comes to a screeching halt. A word isn’t right. But I don’t want to stop my progress. After all, I’m a writing maniac. So I use a placeholder, I’ll come back to this section later and figure out the right word or words to convey my thoughts.

However, I’ve now got an itch I can’t scratch. That thought, that missing word or phase will not leave me alone.

Ever happen to you?

My protagonist whispers he can’t work like this, it’s too unprofessional.

Sigh, okay, I cave, save what little progress I’ve made and return to my placeholder. So I…

  • Think, think, think, I’ve got nothing.
  • Look up the placeholder word. Huh? Not even close. What was I thinking?
  • Check thesaurus. What…

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8 Tips For Formatting Your Book

These tips from Don Massenzio may help you make formatting decisions. I particularly like the idea of using 1.5 line spacing instead of single spacing in print books. Maybe I’ll try that next time!

pile of letters for writing

Check out my Beginner’s Cheat Sheet for formatting your hard copy book in InDesign!

Author Don Massenzio

This blog post is designed to help fellow independently published authors improve the quality of their work, but most of the tips here apply to the formatting of any book. I’m speaking of the formatting of books for the consumption of readers, not formatting your manuscript to send off to an agent or publisher.  There are a whole other set of rules for that exercise.

I’ve put together a list of ten tips that you should consider when putting your book together. They are not in order of priority, but together, they can make your book stand out from the millions of others available through your favorite sales channel.

1. Put Some Thought Into Your Cover

I have to admit, this was something I didn’t waste a lot of time on when I published my first book, Frankly Speaking. I just went ahead and used the Kindle cover creator and cranked…

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February 20, 2017 · 4:43 pm